Socio-economic inequalities in injury incidence in the Netherlands


Abstract


Background: Interventions to reduce socio-economic inequalities in injury incidence should be tailored to specific priority areas that may be identified by descriptive studies. We aimed to provide an overview of existing socio-economic inequalities in injury incidence in the Netherlands and to assess the potential influence of methodological choices on the relationships found.

Methods: Self-reported medically treated injuries (all injuries versus fractures) were derived from a survey among a random sample of 59 063 persons. Injuries resulting in hospital admissions (all injuries versus fractures) were derived from a prospective cohort study of 18 810 participants, linked to the National Hospital Discharge Register for a follow-up period of 7 years. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios of self-reported medically treated injuries and fractures by level of education, occupation and income, and of hospital-admitted injuries by level of education and occupation.

Results: Socio-economic inequalities in injury incidence in the Netherlands were dependent on the indicator of non-fatal injury incidence, indicator of socio-economic status (SES) and studied cause of injury. In the majority of specific relations analyzed, injury risks were not or only moderately elevated in lower SES-classes.

Analyses focusing on injury with higher severity levels (admitted injuries and/or admitted fractures) revealed the steepest SES gradient with odds ratios of injury of 1.5 or more of the lowest socio-economic (educational) groups compared to persons with higher SES (education). In hospital admitted traffic injuries, we found the most striking difference with a threefold higher risk in the lowest educational groups.

Conclusion: Future descriptive research into socio-economic differences in injury incidence should include all three core indicators of SES and separate analyses on the more severe injuries should be conducted.


Keywords


Injury; socio-economic status; inequality; incidence

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NBN: http://nbn.depositolegale.it/urn%3Anbn%3Ait%3Aprex-8693

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2427/5938

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